Why do Most Cultures Have Flood Myths and Stories?

Flood Myths go Global

κατάλογος

Flood myths have been around probably since man first started oral traditions. The most well known in Western culture is the story of Noah’s flood from the Bible but there are many other stories. The Sumerians … [wrote] down their flood myths with the story of Gilgamesh ….
In Europe Plato wrote of the city of Atlantis that swallowed up by the sea. It is said he got his story from the ancient Egyptians. This isn’t to say that Europe did not have any original flood myths, as they did. The Arcadians, Samothrace, ancient Germans, Scandinavians, Celtic, Welsh, Lithuanian, Transylvanian, and Turkish peoples all had various forms of flood myths popping up in their culture.

In Africa flood myths can be seen in the cultures of the Cameroon, Masai, Komililo Nandi, Kwaya, Pygmy, Ababua, Kikuyu, Bakongo, Basonge, Bena-Lulua, Yoruba, Ekoi, Efik-Ibibio, and Mandingo.

 

Matsya-protecting-Manu

In Australia the Aboriginals of each region seemed to have a different flood myth and hundreds of tribes in the Americas each had their own wild stories of flooding as well. These stories often involved animals, sometimes rescuing people, sometimes riding the storm out with boats. In our current modern day world most of the major religions still have at least one flood myth among their texts.

 

The Common Threads

Although all the flood myths vary, sometimes to large degrees, many of them have some thread of commonality. Often these stories are told about one human character or one human family. Animals are involved in many of these stories and there is almost always a moral, with the flood coming only after the human race has committed some wrong doing.

The-Deluge

Theories about their Origin

It’s long been noted that flood myths are one of a handful of stories that seem to be common in almost every culture.
….
One of the most interesting theories is that all these stories could have started out as one story that really happened sometime during the end of the last ice age when glaciers would have been melting rapidly making ocean waters rise and swallowing whole civilizations near the coasts.

….It is an intriguing idea.

….

Οι μύθοι των πλημμυρών υπάρχουν πιθανότατα από τότε που ο άνθρωπος ξεκίνησε τις προφορικές παραδόσεις. Ο πιο γνωστός στη δυτική κουλτούρα είναι η ιστορία της πλημμύρας του Νώε από τη Βίβλο, αλλά υπάρχουν και πολλές άλλες ιστορίες. Οι Σουμέριοι … έγραψαν τους μύθους των πλημμυρών τους με την ιστορία του Gilgamesh ….

 

Noah-ark-on-Mount-Ararat

Έχει από καιρό διαπιστωθεί ότι οι μύθοι των πλημμυρών είναι από τις ιστορίες που φαίνεται να είναι κοινές σε σχεδόν κάθε πολιτισμό. ….

Μια από τις πιο ενδιαφέρουσες θεωρίες είναι ότι όλες αυτές οι ιστορίες θα μπορούσαν να ξεκινήσουν σαν μια ιστορία που πραγματικά συνέβη κάποια στιγμή κατά το τέλος της τελευταίας εποχής των παγετώνων, όταν οι παγετώνες έλιωναν ταχύτατα δημιουργώντας υφάλμυρα νερά και κατάποση ολόκληρων πολιτισμών κοντά στις ακτές. … Είναι μια ενδιαφέρουσα ιδέα.

Κράτα το

9 comments on “Why do Most Cultures Have Flood Myths and Stories?

    • It’s always been part of human nature to be fascinated by and pay attention to the natural world. Great floods and other natural disasters were long seen as the work of angry deities or supernatural entities or powers. But now that we are learning that some stories once viewed as folklore and myth may be rooted in real events, scientists are paying a little more attention to the storytellers of old.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Εξαιρετική ανάρτηση με υπέροχους πίνακες!
    Οι μύθοι γοητεύουν γιατί μεταδίδουν πληροφόρηση με κατανοητό τρόπο!

    ΑΦιλάκια κουκουλωμένα αλλά με ζεστή καρδιά! 🙂

    Like

Leave a Reply to Ladegis Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s