Ndebele house paintings

The Creators Project gets exclusive behind-the-scenes access to the cross-country U.S. tour of renowned South African artist Esther Mahlangu. As she travels through New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, D.C. and Atlanta, we get insight into the craft, skill, matrilineal tradition, innovation, and inspiration behind her larger body of work, as well as the original pieces she created for this (Belvedere)RED campaign, raising money for the Global Fund to fight and eliminate the transmission of HIV/AIDS.

In the 18th century the Ndzundza Ndebele people of South Africa created their own tradition and style of house painting. Until the late 1900s, the Ndebele people were very fierce warriors and large landowners. In the autumn of 1883, they went to war with the neighboring Boer workers. The loss of the war brought on a harsh life and horrible punishments for the Ndebele. Through those hard times expressive symbols were generated by the suffering people expressing their grief. These symbols were the beginning of the African art known as Ndebele house paintings.

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KOKESHI Handcraft tradition of Tōhoku

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At the MUDEC – Museo delle Culture of Milan, an exhibition presents for the first time in Italy a large collection of kokeshi, small doll-like wood sculptures that are considered the cultural emblem of the Tōhoku region, in the north-east of Japan.

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As for the most wooden artistic sculptures, even the production of kokeshi begins with the choice and the cutting of the tree. The manufacturing carried out on the lathe by the master craftsman is completed with a painted decoration that differs according to the schools, the era, and the production area.
As Professor Maria Teresa Orsi writes in the presentation of the exhibition, these dolls “simple, hand-colored in a codified but almost infinite variety of formal Continue reading

‘Always Be Curious’

 

Curiosity

 

Most people have heard of A.B.C or Always Be Closing – the iconic mantra made famous from David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross – which describes a sales strategy where the focus is always on looking for new prospects or on closing existing prospects, and infers that ‘closing the deal’ is the only thing that matters.

I’d like to suggest that a better approach – for life and work – is ‘Always Be Curious’.

Why curiosity?

Curiosity, or the strong desire to learn or know something, originates from the Latin word ‘curiosus’ – eager to know, inquisitive. Continue reading